Chinese Medicine

Discover your own relationship with Chinese Medicine with LeTa

Chinese Medicine for Weight Loss

5eposter

 

Being severely overweight (over fat) increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes, respiratory distress, arthritis and other issues that you do not want (or perhaps you already have). So how do we lose weight without gaining it back? In order to achieve your goal of losing weight (fat specifically) sensibly you need to embrace a multi-faceted approach.

Chinese Medicine is an approach to health that bases its foundation on studying nature, the elements and the animals.
Clinical research into the efficacy of Chinese Medicine for weight loss suggests that its approach can inhibit fat production, enhance intestinal peristalsis to increase stool clearance, improve blood circulation, and speed up the metabolism. Acupuncture plays a key role in this, but understanding certain diet and lifestyle adds to your success as well as herbal medicine.
In the West, we spend millions of dollars on diet and exercise programs.  And the results usually don’t yield intended weight loss but rather short-term weight loss followed shortly by rebound weight gain.

Most of us struggle with weight regulation because much of our focus is solely on the amount of calories consumed and burned as though those are the only parameters considered for weight loss. However, we are missing a crucial piece that Traditional Chinese Medicine considers which is the element of how our bodies are functioning.  A missing piece of the weight-loss equation has to do with energy.  This is not the energy we traditionally think of as the energy we consume as food or the energy we expend through exercise. Rather, this is the energy that is responsible for our vitality, controls our body’s function and well-being.  If that energy is strong and well-balanced, our ability to lose weight and to maintain a healthy weight is tremendously enhanced.

If you want to discover if Chinese Medicine is for you, please call and make an appointment for sustainable weight loss and move into feeling better than you ever have.

 

 

Tuning Forks

Acupuncture without the NEEDLES

Instead of getting a “tune-up” with Acupuncture needles, this is a way to fine-tune your electrical energy with Sound Vibration on specific Acupuncture Points. Tuning forks have been around for ages and it not only feels great to receive a treatment but it’s non-invasive. You are able to hear some sound when the forks are tapped on a nearby rubber pad.

Great for anyone of all ages. I love it as a different way to get in tune, a stress reduction session, astral travel if I may and anyone who doesn’t like the idea of Acupuncture.

 

Tuning Forks on Acupuncture Points

Sound Therapy: “treatment based on the finding that human blood cells respond to sound frequencies by changing color and shape, and the hypothesis that therefore sick or rogue cells can be healed or harmonized by sound. The therapy was developed and researched by French musician and acupuncturist Fabien Maman.”
– Webster’s New Encyclopedic Dictionary 1993

 

Acutonics is a (1) System of vibrational sound healing rooted in Oriental Medicine and philosophy that utilizes tuning forks and symphonic gongs tuned to the planets, Tibetan bowls, bells, drums, and rattles. Connecting body, mind, and soul in the journey toward optimal health, harmonic attunement or at-one-ment with all things in the Universe.  (2) The integral way, undifferentiated wholeness, the essence of Tao.

 

 

Essential Oils

What is an Essential Oil?

If you have ever enjoyed the scent of a rose, you’ve experienced the aromatic qualities of essential oils. These naturally occurring, volatile aromatic compounds are found in the seeds, bark, stems, roots, flowers, and other parts of plants. They can be both beautifully and powerfully fragrant. In addition to giving plants their distinctive smells, essential oils protect plants and play a role in plant pollination. In addition to their intrinsic benefits to plants and being beautifully fragrant to people, essential oils have long been used for food preparation, beauty treatment, and health care practices.

 

FREE classes on learning HOW to use essential oils and WHICH ONES are good for specifically YOUR personal health goals. Check out our online store below:

Click here for my online store.

 

Make sure you are signed up on our email list to get information on our next FREE class. Or check out a list of all of our classes here or book for a FREE consultation:

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Tuina (Medical Massage)

Tuina (also called An mo) is the oldest known system of massage and physical therapy in the world. Originating in China 15,000 years ago, the oldest record of medical massage for trauma was carved on turtle shells. In the Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine (the first comprehensive treaty of Chinese medicine) from 230 B.C., Tuina was described as one of the five major therapies of the time. Tuina has remained an organized and systematically developed form of massage and physical therapy since that time. Currently in China, Tuina is taught as a separate but equal field of study in the major traditional Chinese medical schools. Tuina doctors receive the same demanding training as acupuncturists and herbalists, and enjoy the same level of professional respect.

Tuina uses the Traditional Chinese Medical theory of channels and collaterals (meridians or pathways) and the flow of the Chi energy, as its basic therapeutic orientation. Through the application of massage and manipulation techniques, Tuina seeks to establish a more harmonious Chi energy through the system of channels and collaterals, allowing the body to naturally heal itself. Tuina methods include the use of hand and arm techniques to massage the soft tissue (muscles and tendons) of the body, stimulation of acupressure points to directly affect the flow of Chi energy through the system of channels and collaterals, and manipulation techniques to realign the musculo-skeletal and ligamentous relationships (bone setting). External herbal poultices, compresses, liniments and salves are also used to enhance the other therapeutic methods.

Moxa (Mugwart)

Moxa, also known as Mugwort in English and Artemesia Vulgaris in Latin, is a very special Chinese herb which is applied externally and sometimes decocted as a tea to be taken internally. With a unique spongy texture and a long history of medical use, moxa is one of the highlights of Chinese Medicine! The description here will focus on its external use.

The Chinese word “zhenjiu” — which is now translated as “acupuncture” — actually describes the combination of acupuncture with moxibustion, or moxa-burning. The two techniques used to be understood as two essential parts of one fundamental approach to treating disease and maintaining health. In modern American acupuncture clinics, moxa is used very frequently but still gets far less media attention than acupuncture.

There are a variety of methods for the practice of moxibustion depending on the style of treatment and the condition of the patient. Traditionally, small amounts of the herb are burned directly on the skin, but I use indirect moxibustion style. We use cigar or pole, platform, herb insulated moxibustion. To protect our own health, we avoid inhaling the thick smoke of regular moxibustion by mainly using a smokeless moxa pole, which is a rod of charcoal impregnated with moxa. The ignited pole is held above the point or area being treated, and does not come into contact with the skin. The patient experiences a warming sensation and reports feeling very comfortable and relaxed during the treatment.

Herbal Medicine

Chinese Herbal Medicine is one of the great herbal systems of the world, with an unbroken tradition going back to the 3rd century BC. Yet throughout its history it has continually developed in response to changing clinical conditions, and has been sustained by research into every aspect of its use. This process continues today with the development of modern medical diagnostic techniques and knowledge.

Because of its systematic approach and clinical effectiveness it has for centuries had a very great influence on the theory and practice of medicine in the East, and more recently has grown rapidly in popularity in the West. It still forms a major part of healthcare provision in China, and is provided in state hospitals alongside western medicine. Chinese medicine includes all oriental traditions emerging from Southeast Asia that have their origins in China.

Practitioners may work within a tradition that comes from Japan, Vietnam, Taiwan or Korea. It is a complete medical system that is capable of treating a very wide range of conditions. It includes herbal therapy, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and exercises in breathing and movement (tai chi and qi gong). Some or several of these may be employed in the course of treatment.
Chinese Herbal Medicine, along with the other components of Chinese medicine, is based on the concepts of Yin and Yang. It aims to understand and treat the many ways in which the fundamental balance and harmony between the two may be undermined and the ways in which a person’s Qi or vitality may be depleted or blocked. Clinical strategies are based upon diagnosis of patterns of signs and symptoms that reflect an imbalance.

However, the tradition as a whole places great emphasis on lifestyle management in order to prevent disease before it occurs. Chinese medicine recognises that health is more than just the absence of disease and it has a unique capacity to maintain and enhance our capacity for well being and happiness.

Gua Sha

An ancient Chinese secret, Gua Sha therapy is still practiced by many Chinese today. You may ask, “What is that?” Gua means to scrape or rub. Sha is a “reddish, elevated, millet-like skin rash’ (aka petechiae). Sha is the term used to describe Blood stasis in the subcutaneous tissue before and after it is raised as petechiae. Gua Sha is one technique that intentionally raises a Sha rash or petechiae. It is a traditional ancient Chinese healing technique that dates back over two thousand years.

This ancient method of promoting “qi” or bioelectric vital life energy and blood circulation as well as the removal of toxic heat, stagnant blood and lymph fluid from the body is an extremely important, almost miraculous method of improving one’s health. “Qi” is the constant and vigorous movement of energy or life force that keeps us healthy and alive.

Do you suffer from chronic pain? Excess systemic toxicity? Poor circulation? Lymphatic congestion? Inflammation? Fatigue? Infections? Physical or emotional stress? If so, then you will greatly benefit from Gua Sha treatment.

Gua Sha is used regularly by practitioners and laymen in health care facilities and homes throughout China. The method of applying Gua Sha involves the layering of Gua Sha oil on the skin. This oil is enhanced either with healing herbs or essential oils chosen to aid the extraction of toxic waste. The skin is then scraped in the area of discomfort or at times on the entire body using a specific Gua Sha tool depending on whether the treatment is for physical or emotional healing.

Gua Sha treatments are not painful. As the body is scraped it pushes a build-up of fluid ahead of it, and after it passes, it leaves an indention or vacuum behind which draws toxic fluid out to the surface of the skin from deep within the tissue. The toxic fluid (Sha), floods to the surface and can be seen in small red, deep purple or green pools of blood, it is also often hot on the area that the toxic heat is extracted. Red spots are an indication that toxins are being released. Where the area is deep purple the blood is old and extremely stagnant. A dark green discoloration is a sign that stagnant blood and toxic “qi” are being released from the system.

Electrical Stimulation (E-stim)

Electro-acupuncture, the application of a pulsating electrical current to acupuncture needles as a means of stimulating the acupoints, was developed in China as an extension of hand manipulation of acupuncture needles around 1934. The procedure for electro-acupuncture is to insert the acupuncture needle as would normally be done, attain the qi reaction by hand manipulation, and then attach an electrode to the needle to provide continued stimulation. The benefits of using electrical stimulation are:

It substitutes for prolonged hand maneuvering. This helps assure that the patient gets the amount of stimulation needed, because the practitioner may otherwise pause due to fatigue. Electro-acupuncture may also help reduce total treatment time by providing the continued stimulus. During electro-acupuncture, the practitioner can attend to other patients.
It can produce a stronger stimulation, if desired, without causing tissue damage associated with twirling and lifting and thrusting the needle. Strong stimulation may be needed for difficult cases of neuralgia or paralysis.
It is easier to control the frequency of the stimulus and the amount of stimulus than with hand manipulation of the needles.

Cupping

Cupping is when heated cups are pressed against your skin on acupressure points and the cooling air in the cups creates a vacuum. This vacuum causes a suction effect that makes the cups to stick to your skin. Normally the cups are placed on acupressure points on your neck, shoulders, back and upper arms. Cupping can be done on other parts of your body but it should only be done on soft muscle tissue and should not be done on your face, abdomen or on the lower back of pregnant women. The sucking effect is said to literally suck toxins out of your body. Cupping draws blood to the surface of your skin and this is what causes the red circles you can see in the photos. The darker the circles on your back, the more serious the health problems you have.

The procedure
The procedure for cupping is very straight forward and basic. When you enter the cupping center, you will be escorted to a room with several massage beds. The beds should be covered in clean while towels and are very hygienic. You then take off your upper clothing so the top part of your body is naked then lie face down on a massage bed. The cupping staff will use a small flame to heat the cups and place the cups one by one on your back. The placement of the cups should take no more than two minutes.

Next you’ll be left alone for 10 minutes while the cups open the pores of your skin, suck out poisons and draw blood to the surface of your skin. The sensation of the cups sticking on your back is strange but not uncomfortable so just relax and enjoy your very Chinese experience. Your skin will be tight and you may feel as if the cups will pop off if you breathe too deeply. Don’t worry, I’ve taken very deep breathes while being cupped and the cups never came off.

At the end of 10 minutes the cupping staff will return and gently remove the cups. The cups come of easily and there is no discomfort. You should be warned not to take a shower within 2 hours of the cupping because your pores will still be open.
The rings on your back left by cupping will start to fade in several days and should be gone within a week.

Chinese Dietary Therapy

The science of Traditional Chinese medical dietary therapy involves the understanding the properties of foods and their affects on health as well the use of food for preserving health and preventing and treating illnesses.

The nature of food is defined on the same basis as in Traditional Chinese Medicine. According to the classification of the Dietetic Materia Medica, foods, as with herbal medicines, are grouped by taste. The five principal categories taste are sour, sweet, bitter, pungent and salty. Based on the five element theory, Traditional Chinese Medicine holds that each taste favors an internal organ: sour favors the liver, sweet favors the spleen, bitter favors the heart, pungent favors the lungs, and salty favors the kidney. Generally, each taste has a different impact on the human body.

The nature of food is a fundamental principle in Chinese dietary therapy. Foods are classified into coldness, coolness, warmth, and heat, “the four natures”. In practice, these natures divide into two basic kinds – cold and hot. Regulating the cold and hot of foods is an important aspect of diet regulation practiced by Chinese medical dietary therapy.

Acupuncture

Traditional Chinese medicine is one of the oldest continuous systems of medicine in history, with recorded instances dating as far back as two thousand years before the birth of Christ. This is in sharp contrast to the American or Western forms of health care, which have been in existence for a much shorter time span (the American Medical Association, the largest health care member association in the United States, was formed in 1847, some 3,800 years after the first mention of traditional Chinese medicine).

Chinese medicine is quite complex and can be difficult for some people to comprehend. This is because TCM is based, at least in part, on the Daoist belief that we live in a universe in which everything is interconnected. What happens to one part of the body affects every other part of the body. The mind and body are not viewed separately, but as part of an energetic system. Similarly, organs and organ systems are viewed as interconnected structures that work together to keep the body functioning.

Many of the concepts emphasized in traditional Chinese medicine have no true counterpart in Western medicine. One of these concepts is qi(pronounced “chi”), which is considered a vital force or energy responsible for controlling the workings of the human mind and body. Qi flows through the body via channels, or pathways, which are called meridians. There are a total of 20 meridians: 12 primary meridians, which correspond to specific organs, organ systems or functions, and eight secondary meridians. Imbalances in the flow of qi cause illness; correction of this flow restores the body to balance. Other concepts (such as the Yin/Yang and Five Element Theories) are equally important in order to have a true grasp of traditional Chinese medicine, and will be discussed at length elsewhere on this site.

Many people often equate the practice of acupuncture with the practice of traditional Chinese medicine. This is not entirely true. While acupuncture is the most often practiced component of traditional Chinese medicine, it is simply that – a component, an important piece of a much larger puzzle. Traditional Chinese medicine encompasses several methods designed to help patients achieve and maintain health. Along with acupuncture, TCM incorporates adjunctive techniques such as acupressure and moxibustion; manipulative and massage techniques such as tuina and gua sha; herbal medicine; diet and lifestyle changes; meditation; and exercise (often in the form of qigong or tai chi).

Traditional Chinese medicine should not also be confused with “Oriental medicine.” Whereas traditional Chinese medicine is considered a standardized version of the type of Chinese medicine practice before the Chinese Revolution, Oriental medicine is a catch-all phrase for the styles of acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage and exercise that have been developed and practice not only in Asia, but world-wide.

Although the principles of traditional Chinese medicine may be difficult for some to comprehend, there is little doubt of TCM’s effectiveness. Several studies have reported on traditional Chinese medicine’s success in treating a wide range of conditions, from nausea and vomiting to skin disorders, tennis elbow and back pain. Many Western-trained physicians have begun to see the benefits traditional Chinese medicine has to offer patients and now include acupuncture — at least on a limited basis — as part of their practice. More Americans are also using acupuncture, herbal remedies and other components of traditional Chinese medicine than ever before. The reasons for this vary, but the increasing interest in, and use of, TCM is due in large part to its effectiveness, affordability and lack of adverse side-effects compared to Western medicine.

Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine is one of the oldest continuous systems of medicine in history, with recorded instances dating as far back as two thousand years before the birth of Christ. This is in sharp contrast to the American or Western forms of health care, which have been in existence for a much shorter time span (the American Medical Association, the largest health care member association in the United States, was formed in 1847, some 3,800 years after the first mention of traditional Chinese medicine).

Chinese medicine is quite complex and can be difficult for some people to comprehend. This is because TCM is based, at least in part, on the Daoist belief that we live in a universe in which everything is interconnected. What happens to one part of the body affects every other part of the body. The mind and body are not viewed separately, but as part of an energetic system. Similarly, organs and organ systems are viewed as interconnected structures that work together to keep the body functioning.

Many of the concepts emphasized in traditional Chinese medicine have no true counterpart in Western medicine. One of these concepts is qi(pronounced “chi”), which is considered a vital force or energy responsible for controlling the workings of the human mind and body. Qi flows through the body via channels, or pathways, which are called meridians. There are a total of 20 meridians: 12 primary meridians, which correspond to specific organs, organ systems or functions, and eight secondary meridians. Imbalances in the flow of qi cause illness; correction of this flow restores the body to balance. Other concepts (such as the Yin/Yang and Five Element Theories) are equally important in order to have a true grasp of traditional Chinese medicine, and will be discussed at length elsewhere on this site.

Many people often equate the practice of acupuncture with the practice of traditional Chinese medicine. This is not entirely true. While acupuncture is the most often practiced component of traditional Chinese medicine, it is simply that – a component, an important piece of a much larger puzzle. Traditional Chinese medicine encompasses several methods designed to help patients achieve and maintain health. Along with acupuncture, TCM incorporates adjunctive techniques such as acupressure and moxibustion; manipulative and massage techniques such as tuina and gua sha; herbal medicine; diet and lifestyle changes; meditation; and exercise (often in the form of qigong or tai chi).

Traditional Chinese medicine should not also be confused with “Oriental medicine.” Whereas traditional Chinese medicine is considered a standardized version of the type of Chinese medicine practice before the Chinese Revolution, Oriental medicine is a catch-all phrase for the styles of acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage and exercise that have been developed and practice not only in Asia, but world-wide.

Although the principles of traditional Chinese medicine may be difficult for some to comprehend, there is little doubt of TCM’s effectiveness. Several studies have reported on traditional Chinese medicine’s success in treating a wide range of conditions, from nausea and vomiting to skin disorders, tennis elbow and back pain. Many Western-trained physicians have begun to see the benefits traditional Chinese medicine has to offer patients and now include acupuncture — at least on a limited basis — as part of their practice. More Americans are also using acupuncture, herbal remedies and other components of traditional Chinese medicine than ever before. The reasons for this vary, but the increasing interest in, and use of, TCM is due in large part to its effectiveness, affordability and lack of adverse side-effects compared to Western medicine.

Five Element Acupuncture

 

  • We believe that there is a pattern to our lives that weaves us into the web of the universe
  • We believe that it is our lifetime’s purpose to discover what that unique pattern is so that our life may gain meaning within the context of all that is
  • We believe that, if we fail to find our unique purpose, our life becomes meaningless and empty, and we die unfulfilled
  • We believe there are many roads to self-discovery
  • Five element acupuncture is one of them.

A Universal Theory Woven into Chinese Culture

Like Yin and Yang, TCM’s Five Element theory is ancient and Universal in what it embodies. The Five Elements are deeply woven into the fabric of Chinese culture. In fact, Five Element theory is the foundation of Chinese disciplines such as feng shui, the martial arts, and the I Ching (The Book of Changes, a text also Universal in its understanding and representation of the dynamic balance of opposites and the processes of unfolding events and change).

A Comprehensive Template Reflecting Natural Law

The Five Elements are a comprehensive template that organizes all natural phenomena into five master groups or patterns in nature. Each of the five groups—Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water—include categories such as a season, a direction, climate, stage of growth and development, internal organ, body tissue, emotion, aspect of the soul, taste, color, sound . . . the categories are seemingly limitless. The Five Elements reflect a deep understanding of natural law, the Universal order underlying all things in our world.

A Theory of Connection and Interaction

So what does the Five Element theory say to us about the world we live in? First, it speaks about how all things are connected. It’s easy to go through life without realizing or contemplating in a deep way just how everything is linked to everything else. The Five Elements tells us how.Everything within each element is related. Let’s take the Water element as an example. Look at the Five Element diagram: Water is related to winter, a cold climate, the north, the color black, the Kidneys, the emotion fear. These are things that share a deep, sometimes invisible, connection to each other. When it is winter there is a cold essence, it relates to and impacts in some way the Kidneys, the emotion fear is linked, though not always in an obvious, visible way.The Five Elements show us how the structures and systems in our bodies are connected to each other; how we are connected to our environment and the natural world; how our world is part of the greater universe. Many people today have lost this deep connection to nature and no longer are able to feel this truth resonate in their being. The Universal principle of connection still exists nonetheless.

The Balancing Relationships of Generation and Control

Amazingly, this comprehensive theory goes one quantum step beyond showing how all things are related and connected in five categories to reveal how everything is interconnected and interacts on a mega scale. The Five Elements are five fundamental energies in nature in motion. There is a dynamism between them; they are not static. Within the structure of the Five Elements there are two fundamental relationships: generation and control. Without the balancing nature of these two relationships, things would fall out of order in a flash.When the Five Elements speak about generation, it means a relationship that nurtures and promotes growth. Think of a mother and child. The mother gives birth to her child and provides her energy to ensure the growth of her child. An example of generation is the relationship between the Heart and the Spleen (the Heart generates the Spleen).Control, in terms of the Five Elements, represents a relationship that acts as a restraining energy or force, making sure that things do not grow too quickly or slowly, neither too strong nor too weak. Without control, things would fall out of proportion; balance would be lost. Both are needed to keep order: order at the individual level and on a cosmic scale. (Example: the Liver controls the Spleen.)

The Five Elements and TCM

Five Element theory is essential to the practice of TCM as a healing system. It provides a framework in which to understand, diagnose, and treat all health issues—body, mind, emotions, and spirit. The Five Elements include the internal organs, and the interconnected and interacting relationships between them often fall out of balance, creating health issues. TCM practitioners seek to rebalance these organ relationships with their treatment plans.The Five Elements support TCM’s body-mind-spirit understanding of human health. TCM’s ancient Five Element theory is an incredibly detailed master blueprint that diagrams how nature interacts with the body and how the different dimensions of our being impact each other. Though we may not be aware of it, each action, thought, and emotion impacts in some way our being and health as well as the balance of nature.

What is Qi Gong?

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Qigong is the Mandarin Chinese term used to describe various Chinese systems of physical and mental training for health.  It’s an ancient Chinese health care system that integrates physical postures, breathing techniques and focused intention. The word Qigong (Chi Kung) is made up of two Chinese words. Qi is pronounced chee and is usually translated to mean the life force or vital-energy that flows through all things in the universe. The second word, Gong, pronounced gung, means accomplishment, or skill that is cultivated through steady practice. Together, Qigong (Chi Kung) means cultivating energy, it is a system practiced for health maintenance, healing and increasing vitality.

Qigong is an integration of physical postures, breathing techniques, and focused intentions.
Qigong practices can be classified as martial, medical, or spiritual. All styles have three things in common: they all involve a posture, (whether moving or stationary), breathing techniques, and mental focus. Some practices increase the Qi; others circulate it, use it to cleanse and heal the body, store it, or emit Qi to help heal others. Practices vary from the soft internal styles such as Tai Chi; to the external, vigorous styles such as Kung Fu. However, the slow gentle movements of most Qigong forms can be easily adapted, even for the physically challenged and can be practiced by all age groups.

Like any other system of health care, Qigong is not a panacea, but it is certainly a highly effective health care practice. Many health care professionals recommend Qigong as an important form of alternative complementary medicine.
Qigong creates an awareness of and influences dimensions of our being that are not part of traditional exercise programs. Most exercises do not involve the meridian system used in acupuncture nor do they emphasize the importance of adding mind intent and breathing techniques to physical movements. When these dimensions are added, the benefits of exercise increase exponentially.

The gentle, rhythmic movements of Qigong reduce stress, build stamina, increase vitality, and enhance the immune system. It has also been found to improve cardiovascular, respiratory, circulatory, lymphatic and digestive functions.
Those who maintain a consistent practice of Qigong find that it helps one regain a youthful vitality, maintain health even into old age and helps speed recovery from illness. Western scientific research confirms that Qigong reduces hypertension and the incidence of falling in the aged population. One of the more important long-term effects is that Qigong reestablishes the body/mind/soul connection.
People do Qigong to maintain health, heal their bodies, calm their minds, and reconnect with their spirit.